Date of Award

12-2016

Degree Type

Selective Evidence-Based Medicine Review

Degree Name

Master of Science in Health Sciences - Physician Assistant

Department

Physician Assistant Studies

Department Chair

John Cavenagh, MBA, PhD, PA-C

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this careful EBM review is to determine whether lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) is safe and effective in reducing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms.

Study Design: A systematic review of two randomized controlled studies and one double-blind, 2-arm, parallel-group placebo-controlled RWP published between 2011-2014, all in the English language.

Data Sources: Two randomized controlled trials and one double-blind, 2-arm, parallel-group placebo-controlled RWP published between 2011 and 2014 which were found using PubMed and Cochrane databases.

Outcomes Measured: ADHD global symptomatic improvement was measured using Clinical Global Impressions – Severity of Illness (CGI-S), Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) and ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV). Safety was measured using treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs).

Results: Two randomized controlled trials and one double-blind, 2-arm, parallel-group placebo-controlled RWP revealed that using LDX helped reduce ADHD symptoms greater than the placebo it was compared against. The most common side effects caused by LDX were a headache, insomnia, and decreased appetite.

Conclusion: The literature utilized in this EBM project revealed that children and adolescents that used Vyvanse, demonstrated improvement in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology. Additionally, it was found that LDX was safe for use as the side effects were benign.

Included in

Psychiatry Commons

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