Event Title

Management of HIV-Positive Patients Undergoing CABG: A Case Series

Location

Georgia

Start Date

16-5-2017 1:00 PM

Description

Advances in antiretroviral therapy and the management of opportunistic infections with prophylactic antibiotics have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A large number of patients with HIV develop premature cardiovascular disease as a side effect of their antiretroviral medications and as a complication of their infection. Studies have shown that cardiovascular surgeries such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) may be performed without accelerating immunodeficiency and has acceptable mortality when compared to non-HIV infected patients undergoing similar surgeries. This case series investigates the medication therapy management of three patients with HIV following CABG surgery at a general medical and surgical hospital with 250 beds.

There is limited data on the optimal medication regimen for patients with HIV post-CABG surgery that help manage their cardiovascular disease. Pharmacists can play an important role in assisting the cardiovascular team in optimizing HIV positive patients’ medication regimen post CABG surgery in the optimization of guideline-directed medication therapy for both atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and HIV.

Embargo Period

6-26-2017

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
May 16th, 1:00 PM

Management of HIV-Positive Patients Undergoing CABG: A Case Series

Georgia

Advances in antiretroviral therapy and the management of opportunistic infections with prophylactic antibiotics have greatly improved the prognosis of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A large number of patients with HIV develop premature cardiovascular disease as a side effect of their antiretroviral medications and as a complication of their infection. Studies have shown that cardiovascular surgeries such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) may be performed without accelerating immunodeficiency and has acceptable mortality when compared to non-HIV infected patients undergoing similar surgeries. This case series investigates the medication therapy management of three patients with HIV following CABG surgery at a general medical and surgical hospital with 250 beds.

There is limited data on the optimal medication regimen for patients with HIV post-CABG surgery that help manage their cardiovascular disease. Pharmacists can play an important role in assisting the cardiovascular team in optimizing HIV positive patients’ medication regimen post CABG surgery in the optimization of guideline-directed medication therapy for both atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and HIV.