Event Title

Study of Excitability Changes in Purkinje Cell Output During DCS Stimulation by in Vitro Approach

Location

Georgia

Start Date

16-5-2017 1:00 PM

Description

The cerebellum plays essential roles in movement coordination and motor control. Modulation of cerebellar activity using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has become a potential method of treatment for cerebellar dysfunctions. tDCS has been shown to have an effect on Purkinje cell activity through in vivo studies, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this project, in vitro method was used to quantitatively measure the effects of tDCS on basic properties of Purkinje cells using patch clamp technique. The frequency changes of Purkinje cell action potentials under anodal and cathodal stimulation were compared using a paired student’s t-test (p=0.27, n=5). No significant changes were observed in relationship with orientation of the Purkinje cell. We also analyzed the effect of graded intensity on the firing rate of Purkinje cells starting at 200 μA to maximum 800 μA. Additional efforts were made to study the relationship between the orientation of the Purkinje cell and the electrical field using a multi-compartment model. This model displays specific polarization along the soma-dendrite axis within an electric field (+0.5 to -0.5 mV) generated by DCS.

Embargo Period

6-26-2017

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COinS
 
May 16th, 1:00 PM

Study of Excitability Changes in Purkinje Cell Output During DCS Stimulation by in Vitro Approach

Georgia

The cerebellum plays essential roles in movement coordination and motor control. Modulation of cerebellar activity using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has become a potential method of treatment for cerebellar dysfunctions. tDCS has been shown to have an effect on Purkinje cell activity through in vivo studies, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this project, in vitro method was used to quantitatively measure the effects of tDCS on basic properties of Purkinje cells using patch clamp technique. The frequency changes of Purkinje cell action potentials under anodal and cathodal stimulation were compared using a paired student’s t-test (p=0.27, n=5). No significant changes were observed in relationship with orientation of the Purkinje cell. We also analyzed the effect of graded intensity on the firing rate of Purkinje cells starting at 200 μA to maximum 800 μA. Additional efforts were made to study the relationship between the orientation of the Purkinje cell and the electrical field using a multi-compartment model. This model displays specific polarization along the soma-dendrite axis within an electric field (+0.5 to -0.5 mV) generated by DCS.