Title

Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of a pharmacist-managed hypertension clinic

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2001

Abstract

Study Objective. To measure clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes associated with a pharmacist-managed hypertension clinic compared with physician-managed clinics. Design. Prospective, randomized, comparative study. Setting. Managed care organization. Patients. A total of 330 patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension. Intervention. Hypertension care provided by either the pharmacist-managed hypertension clinic or physician-managed general medical clinics. Measurements and Main Results. Baseline and 6-month evaluations consisted of systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements, a short-form health survey, and collection of health care utilization information. After treatment, blood pressure measurements were significantly lower (p<0.001) in the pharmacist-managed hypertension clinic group than in the physician-managed clinic group. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the hypertension clinic group. Total costs for the hypertension clinic group were not different from those of the physician-managed clinic group ($242.46 vs $233.20, p=0.71), but cost:effectiveness ratios were lower in the hypertension clinic group ($27 vs $193/mm Hg for systolic blood pressure readings, and $48 vs $151/mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure readings). Conclusion. In a hypertension clinic, pharmacists can be a cost-effective alternative to physicians in management of patients, and they can improve clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction.

Publication Title

Pharmacotherapy

Volume

21

Issue

11

First Page

1337

Last Page

1344

Comments

This article was published in Pharmacotherapy, Volume 21, Issue 11, Pages 1337-1344.

The published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1592/phco.21.17.1337.34424 .

Copyright © 2001 Wiley.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS