Title

The History of Home Cardiorespiratory Monitoring

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-1-2017

Abstract

Home cardiorespiratory monitoring has changed significantly since it was first introduced in the 1970s. It has improved from a simple alarm system to a sophisticated piece of equipment capable of monitoring the patient's electrocardiogram, respiratory effort, and oxygen saturations. In addition, the indications for using a monitor have also changed. The home monitor was initially used to reduce the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Although there were several studies demonstrating the reduction of SIDS rates in communities where apnea programs existed, none was a prospective, double-blinded study or had adequate numbers to be clinically significant. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics took the stance that monitors were not an effective way to reduce SIDS. However, when used appropriately, as part of a complete program (ie, the monitor is just one of many clinically based modalities), by a clinician with expertise in interpreting download tracings, home cardiorespiratory monitoring can be a useful, lifesaving, and economical tool to observe infants who are at increased risk of sudden death or increased morbidity secondary to intermittent hypoxia.

Publication Title

Pediatric Annals

Volume

46

Issue

8

First Page

303

Last Page

308

PubMed ID

28806467

Comments

This article was published in Pediatric Annals, Volume 46, Issue 8, Pages e303-e308.

The published version is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/19382359-20170725-01.

Copyright © 2017.

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